1892

Presbyterian Hospital Training School for Nurses, which later becomes Columbia University School of Nursing, is founded as one of the first nursing schools in the nation.

1892-1921

Anna C. Maxwell serves as the school’s first dean.

1894

The school’s first class of 21 student graduates.

1897

Students from the class of 1897.
Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital Training School for Nurses

1899

The Alumnae Association of the Presbyterian Hospital Training School for Nurses in the City of New York is incorporated.

1904

Florence Nightingale Hall, the school's first residence, opens on East 71st Street opposite Presbyterian Hospital.

1904

Anna C. Maxwell teaching in Florence Nightingale Hall.

1904

Students staff Presbyterian Hospital’s new
visiting nurse service, predecessor to the hospital’s department of social work, one of the first in the U.S.

1917–1919

188 graduates of the school serve overseas during World War I; pictured here are nurses of Base Hospital #2 in Étretat, France.

1921–1937

Helen Young serves as dean.

1928

Maxwell Hall, the school’s new home, opens within the new Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center and plays a central role in helping to create the first medical center.

1937

Margaret Conrad serves as dean. Conrad is the first leader of the school under its new affiliation with Columbia.

1937–1950

Margaret Conrad serves as dean. Conrad is the first leader of the school under its new affiliation with Columbia.

1940

Helen Young presenting surgical instruments to Great Britain’s Duchess of Leinster for use in World War II.

1944

Columbia Nursing is involved in virtually every facet of nursing’s campaign in World War II. Its most public contribution is to the Second General Hospital of the U.S. Army, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center's overseas military hospital unit.

1944

Second General Hospital evacuation patients in Lison, France.

1949

President Dwight D. Eisenhower (far left) congratulates graduates of the class of 1949.

1950-1961

Eleanor Lee serves as dean.

1954

Eleanor Lee pinning a student with the PH pin at graduation.

1956

Columbia Nursing is the first school to award a master's degree in nurse midwifery.
Lusta Felicita

1957

Carrie J. Conser Henry the school’s first African American student graduates from Columbia University School of Nursing. Above, Lusta Felicita "Bonnie" Johnson, Class of 1968, another early African-American graduate.
Sigma Theta Tau Nursing Honor Society

1964

The Alpha Zeta chapter of Sigma Theta Tau Nursing Honor Society is formally installed.
Sigma Theta Tau Nursing Honor Society

1961–1968

Elizabeth Gill serves as dean.
Mary Crawford serves as dean.

1968–1976

Mary Crawford serves as dean.
Mary Crawford serves as dean.
Ramon Lavandero '72 and John Mladinich '72

1970

The first male students are admitted into Columbia Nursing. (Ramon Lavandero '72 and John Mladinich '72)
Ramon Lavandero '72 and John Mladinich '72
Helen Pettit serves as dean.

1976–1981

Helen Pettit serves as dean.
Helen Pettit serves as dean.
Joann S. Jamann-Riley

1981–1985

Joann S. Jamann-Riley serves as dean.
Joann S. Jamann-Riley
Acute care specialty is introduced
Pediatric specialty is introduced

1984

Pediatric specialty is introduced.
Joann S. Jamann-Riley
Oncology nursing

1984

Oncology nursing specialty is introduced in collaboration with the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.
Oncology nursing
Georgian Building

1986

Georgian Building becomes the new home to Columbia Nursing students.
Mary Mundinger
Mary Mundinger

1986–2010

Mary Mundinger serves as dean.
Mary Mundinger
Pediatric specialty introduced.
Dean Mundinger with New York City Mayor David Dinkins

1990

Dean Mundinger with New York City Mayor David Dinkins, his daughter Donna Dinkins Hoggard '90, and his granddaughter.
Dean Mundinger with New York City Mayor David Dinkins
Family Nurse Practitioner program introduced
Nurse Anesthesia program is introduced.

1990

Nurse Anesthesia program is introduced.
Nurse Anesthesia program is introduced.
Doctor of Nursing Science program
Endowed chair in health policy
Columbia Advanced Practice Nurse Associates

1996

Columbia Nursing becomes the first school named a World Health Organization Collaborating Center for the International Nursing Development of Advanced Practice, a designation recognizing its expertise and commitment to advanced practice nursing.
Columbia Advanced Practice Nurse Associates
Columbia Advanced Practice Nurse Associates

1997

Columbia Nursing establishes Columbia Advanced Practice Nurse Associates (CAPNA), the first independent primary care faculty practice. CAPNA nurse practitioners were compensated at the same rate as primary care physicians.
Columbia Advanced Practice Nurse Associates
Columbia Advanced Practice Nurse Associates

1998

Columbia University School of Nursing Alumni Association is established; pictured are board members and student guests at a 2015 meeting.
Columbia Advanced Practice Nurse Associates
CU Nursing
CU Nursing
Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)

2004

Columbia Nursing is among the first schools to develop and offer a doctoral degree in clinical nursing, the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP). Pictured: The first DNP graduates in 2005.
Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)
Dean Bobbie Berkowitz

2010-Present

Bobbie Berkowitz serves as dean.
Dean Bobbie Berkowitz
CU Nursing
CU Nursing
Groundbreaking

2014

Columbia Nursing breaks ground at the site for the school's new building. Pictured: Lee Goldman, Executive Vice President and Dean of the Faculties of Health Sciences and Medicine; Chief Executive, Columbia University Medical Center; Bobbie Berkowitz, Dean, Columbia Nursing; Lee Bollinger, President, Columbia University.
Columbia Nursing, mew building
Dean Bobbie Berkowitz

2015

Columbia Nursing tops off its new state-of-the-art building, scheduled to open in 2017.
Columbia Nursing, mew building
Nairobi, Kenya

2015

Columbia Nursing sponsors milestone conference in Nairobi, Kenya, to create an action plan to identify knowledge gaps in clinical care.
Nairobi, Kenya
The Jonas Center for Nursing and Veterans Healthcare

2015

The Jonas Center for Nursing and Veterans Healthcare announces that, beginning in 2017, it will be housed at Columbia University School of Nursing via an $11.1 million, 10-year grant.
The Jonas Center for Nursing and Veterans Healthcare
Amman, Jordan

2016

Columbia Nursing hosts the Global Nursing and Midwifery Clinical Research Development Initiative in Amman, Jordan. Experts from 22 countries in the Eastern Mediterranean region identified methods to address critical regional health needs.
Nairobi, Kenya
CU Nursing
Master's entry curriculum
CU Nursing
Mobile HIV intervention
Ribbon Cutting

2016

Columbia Nursing renames CAPNA as the Nurse Practitioner Group and opens locations in Washington Heights and Morningside Heights.
Ribbon Cutting
Columbia Nursing’s new building

2017

Columbia Nursing’s new building opens. The school celebrates 125 years of transforming the education and profession of nursing.
Columbia Nursing’s new building
125 YEARS OF NURSING
Columbia Nursing’s impact on nursing began 125 years ago when it opened its doors in 1892. It was then that Anna C. Maxwell, the school’s first dean, set the standard for nursing education and service that would become the foundation for Columbia Nursing’s excellence in the decades to come. It was Maxwell’s pioneering spirit and unwavering belief in the power of nursing that opened new horizons for the profession and paved the way for today’s nurse  clinicians and scientists.
CELEBRATE 125 YEARS
Columbia University School of Nursing
http://nursing.columbia.edu
Support Columbia Nursing’s future
http://nursing.columbia.edu/future
Columbia Nursing Nurse Practitioner Group
http://www.columbianps.org